Kinda! There is no simple or standard way to do it, but it's possible. You can change the cursor to different built-in native versions with CSS with the cursor property, but that doesn't help much here. You can also use that property to set a static image as the cursor. But again that doesn't help much because you can't rotate it once it's there.

The trick is to totally hide the cursor with cursor: none; and replace it with your own element.

Here's an example of that:

See the Pen
Move fake mouse with JavaScript
by Chris Coyier (@chriscoyier)
on CodePen.

That's not rotating yet. But now that the cursor is just some element on the page, CSS's transform: rotate(); is fully capable of that job. Some math is required.

I'll leave that to Aaron Iker's really fun demo:

See the Pen
Mouse cursor pointing to cta
by Aaron Iker (@aaroniker)
on CodePen.

Is this an accessibility problem? Something about it makes me think it might be. It's a little extra motion where you aren't expecting it and perhaps a little disorienting when an element you might rely on for a form of stability starts moving on you. It's really only something you'd do for limited-use novelty and while respecting the prefers-reduced-motion. You could also keep the original cursor and do something under it, as Jackson Callaway has done here.

The post Can you rotate the cursor in CSS? appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

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